Development of and Policy on the Range and Pastoral Industry with Special Reference to Kenya

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dc.contributor.author Nyariki, Dickson M.
dc.contributor.author Musimba, N. K. R.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-02-25T06:41:58Z
dc.date.available 2017-02-25T06:41:58Z
dc.date.issued 2003
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/186
dc.identifier.uri http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09720073.2003.11890818
dc.identifier.uri 321223043_Development_of_and_Policy_on_the_Range_and_Pastoral_Industry_with_Special_Reference_to_Kenya
dc.identifier.uri http://repository.seku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/647
dc.description.abstract Rangeland” or simply “range” is, by definition, “inferior” land by reason of physical and socio-economic limitations such as low rainfall, high temperatures, poor soils, and long distances from market outlets and supply centres. It has been variously defined by others (cf. Stoddart and Smith, 1955; Pratt and Gwynne, 1977); but, in general, it is land that carries natural vegetation that provides forage for both domestic and wild herbivores. It may also be a source of other products, including water, minerals, and services such as recreation. The rangelands of Kenya, for example, receive less than 750 mm of rain per year and have average temperatures that occasionally rise to 40°C. These are extensive lands covering about 85% of the total land area of 583,000km2. This expansive area is home to 25% of the total human population, estimated at 29 million (GOK, 1999). The density is as low as two persons per km2 in the very arid parts en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject range land en_US
dc.title Development of and Policy on the Range and Pastoral Industry with Special Reference to Kenya en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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